Healing Path, Inc.




Finding Balance
Chapter 2.19 -Migraine Disorder

In this chapter, Dr. Donache presents Complementary/Alternative Medical (C.A.M.) Therapies for the prevention and treatment of Migraine disorders and migraine headaches.

The chapter includes an overview of the disease's symptoms, conventional treatment methods, and alternative therapies, including Bio-Energetic therapies, Bodywork and Movement therapies, and Mental / Emotional treatments.

This chapter is taken from Dr. Donache's upcoming book, Finding Balance - Integrating Complementary/Alternative Medical (C.A.M.) Therapies for the Prevention of the Top 30 Diseases in America. Each section of chapter 2, which describes alternative treatments for each of the top diseases, is available as a download on this website.

Table of Contents
Chapter Excerpt
Glossary of Terms Used in this Chapter
Additional Disease Descriptions and Treatments Available for Download

Table of Contents

  1. ABOUT THIS DOCUMENT
  2. MIGRAINE DISORDER
    1. Auras
  3. CONVENTIONAL APPROACHES
    1. TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT
      • Over-the-Counter Medications
      • Prescription Medications
        1. Abortive Drugs
        2. Preventive Drugs
      • Other Headache Treatments
      • Issues and Answers
  4. C.A.M. THERAPIES
    1. BIO-ENERGETIC THERAPIES
      • Nutrition and Supplements
        • Nutrition
        • Supplements
        • Enzymatic Therapies
      • Rainforest and Western Herbs
        • Rainforest Herbs
        • Western Herbs
      • Homeopathic Remedies
      • Essential Oils
    2. BODYWORK AND MOVEMENT THERAPIES
      • Therapeutic Bodywork and Massage
      • Traditional Chinese Medicine
      • Hatha Yoga Postures
    3. MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL SUPPORT
      • Meditation
      • Visualization
      • Affirmation
  5. APPENDICES
    1. RESOURCES
    2. PRODUCT ORDERING INFORMATION
    3. GLOSSARY OF TERMS

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Chapter Excerpt

More than 90% of us get headaches. Three times as many women as men suffer from migraines. Men are five times as likely to have cluster headaches. Some 50 million get migraine headaches and is one of the largest causes of absenteeism from work. Migraine sufferers are called "Migraineurs".

Most are fairly mild, but some are so severe and frequent--even disabling--that they require medical attention. Most common are tension-type headaches, which are intermittent and marked by pressure on both sides of the head. More uncommon are cluster headaches, which involve pain on one side of the head--usually behind one eye. Tearing of the eye and drooping of the eyelid may occur. Pain may subside after half an hour, then return. This cycle can last for weeks at a time, and are often referred to as suicidal headache.

Migraine headaches usually involve throbbing pain on one side of the head, stomach upset, and sensitivity to light and noise. Migraines don't commonly occur every day, but can last for hours or even for days. Initially, doctors will compile a detailed history of your symptoms and may test your vision, hearing, reflexes, muscle strength and balance.

Computed tomography (CT) scanning or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of your brain might be used to rule out other medical conditions, though neither test is necessary to diagnose headaches. Some researchers believe migraines may be traced to a disturbance in one area of the brain. The trigeminal nerve, which originates in the brain stem, carries messages from much of the head and face to the brain. A disturbance in the trigeminal nerve may trigger the release of peptides at the nerve endings. In high numbers, peptides may cause inflammation of blood vessels and tissues around the brain. The inflamed blood vessels trigger nearby nerves, sending pain signals that may result in a migraine headache. 70% or more of sufferers have at least one close relative with the disorder. About 25% of migraine cases begin in childhood. In adolescence, when the menstrual cycle begins and hormone levels begin to fluctuate girls become more vulnerable to migraine.

Among adults, three times more women than men suffer migraine. Migraine may occur with or without aura--a forewarning that usually precedes the onset of a migraine by less than an hour. Some people briefly lose a part of their field of vision; others notice what is referred to as a scintillating scotoma--bright flashing lights that move across their visual field. Another warning sign is a prodrome, which may be any of a variety of symptoms that can occur 24 to 48 hours before the onset of the headache. A patient may have food cravings; become fatigued, depressed, giddy, overly sensitive or angry; or experience nausea and diarrhea.

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Glossary of Terms

Term
Definition
Analgesics
Prescription and over-the-counter medications that alleviate pain.
Aura
A forewarning, often immediately preceding a migraine headaches; may include visual or other sensory disturbances.
Biofeedback
A relaxation training technique in which patients are connected to a machine that helps them learn control over processes like muscle tension and skin temperature.
Cluster Headache
The least common primary headache; often brief, but the cycle of pain can recur for weeks at a time; characterized by pain behind one eye with tearing and nasal stuffiness on that side.
Computer Tomography (CT) Scanning
A diagnostic technique using multiple X-rays taken from different angles to create an image of internal organs.
Ergotamine Derivatives
Drugs taken at the onset of migraine that can stop attacks by constricting arteries.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
A diagnostic technique that uses a strong magnetic field to produce computerized images of internal body tissues.
Migraine Headache
Headache marked by throbbing pain on one side of the head, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting and a sensitivity to light and noise.
Peptides
Substances that may be released when there is a disturbance in the trigeminal nerve of the brain; may contribute to headaches by causing inflammation of blood vessels and tissues around the brain.
Prodrome
Warning symptoms that occur during the days immediately before a migraine; symptoms may include food cravings and mood swings.
Sumatriptan
A drug used to stop migraine attacks by reducing inflammation in pain-sensitive areas or by preventing the enlargement of certain arteries in the head; may be self-injected or taken orally.
Tension-Type Headache
The most common type of headache, marked by painful pressure on both sides of the head, most often at the forehead and temples.

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